Struct glib::GString

source ·
pub struct GString(/* private fields */);
Expand description

A type representing an owned, C-compatible, nul-terminated UTF-8 string.

GString is to &GStr as String is to &str: the former in each pair are owned strings; the latter are borrowed references.

This type is similar to std::ffi::CString, but with some special behavior. When debug assertions are enabled, From<String> will panic if there are interior nul-bytes. In production builds, no checks will be made for interior nul-bytes, and strings that contain interior nul-bytes will simply end at first nul-byte when converting to a C string.

The constructors beginning with from_utf8 and from_string can also be used to further control how interior nul-bytes are handled.

Implementations§

source§

impl GString

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pub fn new() -> Self

Creates a new empty GString.

Does not allocate.

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pub fn format(args: Arguments<'_>) -> Self

Formats an Arguments into a GString.

This function is the same as std::fmt::format, except it returns a GString. The Arguments instance can be created with the format_args! macro.

Please note that using gformat! might be preferable.

source

pub fn from_utf8(bytes: Vec<u8>) -> Result<Self, FromUtf8Error>

Creates a GLib string by consuming a byte vector.

Takes ownership of bytes. Returns Err if it contains invalid UTF-8.

A trailing nul-byte will be appended by this function.

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pub fn from_utf8_checked( bytes: Vec<u8>, ) -> Result<Self, GStringFromError<Vec<u8>>>

Creates a GLib string by consuming a byte vector, checking for interior nul-bytes.

Takes ownership of bytes, as long as it is valid UTF-8 and does not contain any interior nul-bytes. Otherwise, Err is returned.

A trailing nul-byte will be appended by this function.

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pub unsafe fn from_utf8_unchecked(v: Vec<u8>) -> Self

Unsafely creates a GLib string by consuming a byte vector, without checking for UTF-8 or interior nul-bytes.

A trailing nul-byte will be appended by this function.

§Safety

The byte vector must not contain invalid UTF-8 characters. It is undefined behavior to pass a vector that contains invalid UTF-8.

source

pub fn from_utf8_with_nul( bytes: Vec<u8>, ) -> Result<Self, GStringFromError<Vec<u8>>>

Creates a GLib string by consuming a nul-terminated byte vector, without checking for interior nul-bytes.

Takes ownership of bytes. Returns Err if it contains invalid UTF-8 or does not have a trailing nul-byte.

source

pub fn from_utf8_with_nul_checked( bytes: Vec<u8>, ) -> Result<Self, GStringFromError<Vec<u8>>>

Creates a GLib string by consuming a nul-terminated byte vector.

Takes ownership of bytes. Returns Err if it contains invalid UTF-8, does not have a trailing nul-byte, or contains interior nul-bytes.

source

pub unsafe fn from_utf8_with_nul_unchecked(v: Vec<u8>) -> Self

Creates a GLib string by consuming a byte vector, without checking for UTF-8, a trailing nul-byte, or interior nul-bytes.

§Safety

The byte vector must not contain invalid UTF-8 characters, and must have a trailing nul-byte. It is undefined behavior to pass a vector that does not uphold those conditions.

source

pub fn from_utf8_until_nul( bytes: Vec<u8>, ) -> Result<Self, GStringFromError<Vec<u8>>>

Creates a GLib string by consuming a nul-terminated byte vector, truncating it at the first nul-byte.

Takes ownership of bytes. Returns Err if it contains invalid UTF-8 or does not contain at least one nul-byte.

source

pub fn from_string_checked( s: String, ) -> Result<Self, GStringInteriorNulError<String>>

Creates a GLib string by consuming a string, checking for interior nul-bytes.

Takes ownership of s, as long as it does not contain any interior nul-bytes. Otherwise, Err is returned.

A trailing nul-byte will be appended by this function.

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pub fn from_string_unchecked(s: String) -> Self

Creates a GLib string by consuming a string, without checking for interior nul-bytes.

A trailing nul-byte will be appended by this function.

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pub unsafe fn from_ptr_lossy<'a>(ptr: *const c_char) -> Cow<'a, GStr>

Wraps a raw C string with a safe GLib string wrapper. The provided C string must be nul-terminated. All constraints from std::ffi::CStr::from_ptr also apply here.

If the string is valid UTF-8 then it is directly returned otherwise a copy is created with every invalid character replaced by the Unicode replacement character (U+FFFD).

source

pub unsafe fn from_ptr_and_len_unchecked(ptr: *const c_char, len: usize) -> Self

Wraps a raw C string with a safe GLib string wrapper. The provided C string must be nul-terminated. All constraints from std::ffi::CStr::from_ptr also apply here.

len is the length without the nul-terminator, i.e. if len == 0 is passed then *ptr must be the nul-terminator.

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pub fn as_str(&self) -> &str

Return the GString as string slice.

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pub fn as_gstr(&self) -> &GStr

Extracts the GStr containing the entire string.

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pub fn as_ptr(&self) -> *const c_char

Return the underlying pointer of the GString.

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pub fn into_bytes(self) -> Vec<u8>

Consumes the GString and returns the underlying byte buffer.

The returned buffer is not guaranteed to contain a trailing nul-byte.

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pub fn into_bytes_with_nul(self) -> Vec<u8>

Consumes the GString and returns the underlying byte buffer, with trailing nul-byte.

Methods from Deref<Target = str>§

1.0.0 · source

pub fn len(&self) -> usize

Returns the length of self.

This length is in bytes, not chars or graphemes. In other words, it might not be what a human considers the length of the string.

§Examples
let len = "foo".len();
assert_eq!(3, len);

assert_eq!("ƒoo".len(), 4); // fancy f!
assert_eq!("ƒoo".chars().count(), 3);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn is_empty(&self) -> bool

Returns true if self has a length of zero bytes.

§Examples
let s = "";
assert!(s.is_empty());

let s = "not empty";
assert!(!s.is_empty());
1.9.0 · source

pub fn is_char_boundary(&self, index: usize) -> bool

Checks that index-th byte is the first byte in a UTF-8 code point sequence or the end of the string.

The start and end of the string (when index == self.len()) are considered to be boundaries.

Returns false if index is greater than self.len().

§Examples
let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
assert!(s.is_char_boundary(0));
// start of `老`
assert!(s.is_char_boundary(6));
assert!(s.is_char_boundary(s.len()));

// second byte of `ö`
assert!(!s.is_char_boundary(2));

// third byte of `老`
assert!(!s.is_char_boundary(8));
source

pub fn floor_char_boundary(&self, index: usize) -> usize

🔬This is a nightly-only experimental API. (round_char_boundary)

Finds the closest x not exceeding index where is_char_boundary(x) is true.

This method can help you truncate a string so that it’s still valid UTF-8, but doesn’t exceed a given number of bytes. Note that this is done purely at the character level and can still visually split graphemes, even though the underlying characters aren’t split. For example, the emoji 🧑‍🔬 (scientist) could be split so that the string only includes 🧑 (person) instead.

§Examples
#![feature(round_char_boundary)]
let s = "❤️🧡💛💚💙💜";
assert_eq!(s.len(), 26);
assert!(!s.is_char_boundary(13));

let closest = s.floor_char_boundary(13);
assert_eq!(closest, 10);
assert_eq!(&s[..closest], "❤️🧡");
source

pub fn ceil_char_boundary(&self, index: usize) -> usize

🔬This is a nightly-only experimental API. (round_char_boundary)

Finds the closest x not below index where is_char_boundary(x) is true.

If index is greater than the length of the string, this returns the length of the string.

This method is the natural complement to floor_char_boundary. See that method for more details.

§Examples
#![feature(round_char_boundary)]
let s = "❤️🧡💛💚💙💜";
assert_eq!(s.len(), 26);
assert!(!s.is_char_boundary(13));

let closest = s.ceil_char_boundary(13);
assert_eq!(closest, 14);
assert_eq!(&s[..closest], "❤️🧡💛");
1.0.0 · source

pub fn as_bytes(&self) -> &[u8]

Converts a string slice to a byte slice. To convert the byte slice back into a string slice, use the from_utf8 function.

§Examples
let bytes = "bors".as_bytes();
assert_eq!(b"bors", bytes);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn as_ptr(&self) -> *const u8

Converts a string slice to a raw pointer.

As string slices are a slice of bytes, the raw pointer points to a u8. This pointer will be pointing to the first byte of the string slice.

The caller must ensure that the returned pointer is never written to. If you need to mutate the contents of the string slice, use as_mut_ptr.

§Examples
let s = "Hello";
let ptr = s.as_ptr();
1.20.0 · source

pub fn get<I>(&self, i: I) -> Option<&<I as SliceIndex<str>>::Output>
where I: SliceIndex<str>,

Returns a subslice of str.

This is the non-panicking alternative to indexing the str. Returns None whenever equivalent indexing operation would panic.

§Examples
let v = String::from("🗻∈🌏");

assert_eq!(Some("🗻"), v.get(0..4));

// indices not on UTF-8 sequence boundaries
assert!(v.get(1..).is_none());
assert!(v.get(..8).is_none());

// out of bounds
assert!(v.get(..42).is_none());
1.20.0 · source

pub unsafe fn get_unchecked<I>(&self, i: I) -> &<I as SliceIndex<str>>::Output
where I: SliceIndex<str>,

Returns an unchecked subslice of str.

This is the unchecked alternative to indexing the str.

§Safety

Callers of this function are responsible that these preconditions are satisfied:

  • The starting index must not exceed the ending index;
  • Indexes must be within bounds of the original slice;
  • Indexes must lie on UTF-8 sequence boundaries.

Failing that, the returned string slice may reference invalid memory or violate the invariants communicated by the str type.

§Examples
let v = "🗻∈🌏";
unsafe {
    assert_eq!("🗻", v.get_unchecked(0..4));
    assert_eq!("∈", v.get_unchecked(4..7));
    assert_eq!("🌏", v.get_unchecked(7..11));
}
1.0.0 · source

pub unsafe fn slice_unchecked(&self, begin: usize, end: usize) -> &str

👎Deprecated since 1.29.0: use get_unchecked(begin..end) instead

Creates a string slice from another string slice, bypassing safety checks.

This is generally not recommended, use with caution! For a safe alternative see str and Index.

This new slice goes from begin to end, including begin but excluding end.

To get a mutable string slice instead, see the slice_mut_unchecked method.

§Safety

Callers of this function are responsible that three preconditions are satisfied:

  • begin must not exceed end.
  • begin and end must be byte positions within the string slice.
  • begin and end must lie on UTF-8 sequence boundaries.
§Examples
let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";

unsafe {
    assert_eq!("Löwe 老虎 Léopard", s.slice_unchecked(0, 21));
}

let s = "Hello, world!";

unsafe {
    assert_eq!("world", s.slice_unchecked(7, 12));
}
1.4.0 · source

pub fn split_at(&self, mid: usize) -> (&str, &str)

Divide one string slice into two at an index.

The argument, mid, should be a byte offset from the start of the string. It must also be on the boundary of a UTF-8 code point.

The two slices returned go from the start of the string slice to mid, and from mid to the end of the string slice.

To get mutable string slices instead, see the split_at_mut method.

§Panics

Panics if mid is not on a UTF-8 code point boundary, or if it is past the end of the last code point of the string slice. For a non-panicking alternative see split_at_checked.

§Examples
let s = "Per Martin-Löf";

let (first, last) = s.split_at(3);

assert_eq!("Per", first);
assert_eq!(" Martin-Löf", last);
1.80.0 · source

pub fn split_at_checked(&self, mid: usize) -> Option<(&str, &str)>

Divide one string slice into two at an index.

The argument, mid, should be a valid byte offset from the start of the string. It must also be on the boundary of a UTF-8 code point. The method returns None if that’s not the case.

The two slices returned go from the start of the string slice to mid, and from mid to the end of the string slice.

To get mutable string slices instead, see the split_at_mut_checked method.

§Examples
let s = "Per Martin-Löf";

let (first, last) = s.split_at_checked(3).unwrap();
assert_eq!("Per", first);
assert_eq!(" Martin-Löf", last);

assert_eq!(None, s.split_at_checked(13));  // Inside “ö”
assert_eq!(None, s.split_at_checked(16));  // Beyond the string length
1.0.0 · source

pub fn chars(&self) -> Chars<'_>

Returns an iterator over the chars of a string slice.

As a string slice consists of valid UTF-8, we can iterate through a string slice by char. This method returns such an iterator.

It’s important to remember that char represents a Unicode Scalar Value, and might not match your idea of what a ‘character’ is. Iteration over grapheme clusters may be what you actually want. This functionality is not provided by Rust’s standard library, check crates.io instead.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let word = "goodbye";

let count = word.chars().count();
assert_eq!(7, count);

let mut chars = word.chars();

assert_eq!(Some('g'), chars.next());
assert_eq!(Some('o'), chars.next());
assert_eq!(Some('o'), chars.next());
assert_eq!(Some('d'), chars.next());
assert_eq!(Some('b'), chars.next());
assert_eq!(Some('y'), chars.next());
assert_eq!(Some('e'), chars.next());

assert_eq!(None, chars.next());

Remember, chars might not match your intuition about characters:

let y = "y̆";

let mut chars = y.chars();

assert_eq!(Some('y'), chars.next()); // not 'y̆'
assert_eq!(Some('\u{0306}'), chars.next());

assert_eq!(None, chars.next());
1.0.0 · source

pub fn char_indices(&self) -> CharIndices<'_>

Returns an iterator over the chars of a string slice, and their positions.

As a string slice consists of valid UTF-8, we can iterate through a string slice by char. This method returns an iterator of both these chars, as well as their byte positions.

The iterator yields tuples. The position is first, the char is second.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let word = "goodbye";

let count = word.char_indices().count();
assert_eq!(7, count);

let mut char_indices = word.char_indices();

assert_eq!(Some((0, 'g')), char_indices.next());
assert_eq!(Some((1, 'o')), char_indices.next());
assert_eq!(Some((2, 'o')), char_indices.next());
assert_eq!(Some((3, 'd')), char_indices.next());
assert_eq!(Some((4, 'b')), char_indices.next());
assert_eq!(Some((5, 'y')), char_indices.next());
assert_eq!(Some((6, 'e')), char_indices.next());

assert_eq!(None, char_indices.next());

Remember, chars might not match your intuition about characters:

let yes = "y̆es";

let mut char_indices = yes.char_indices();

assert_eq!(Some((0, 'y')), char_indices.next()); // not (0, 'y̆')
assert_eq!(Some((1, '\u{0306}')), char_indices.next());

// note the 3 here - the previous character took up two bytes
assert_eq!(Some((3, 'e')), char_indices.next());
assert_eq!(Some((4, 's')), char_indices.next());

assert_eq!(None, char_indices.next());
1.0.0 · source

pub fn bytes(&self) -> Bytes<'_>

An iterator over the bytes of a string slice.

As a string slice consists of a sequence of bytes, we can iterate through a string slice by byte. This method returns such an iterator.

§Examples
let mut bytes = "bors".bytes();

assert_eq!(Some(b'b'), bytes.next());
assert_eq!(Some(b'o'), bytes.next());
assert_eq!(Some(b'r'), bytes.next());
assert_eq!(Some(b's'), bytes.next());

assert_eq!(None, bytes.next());
1.1.0 · source

pub fn split_whitespace(&self) -> SplitWhitespace<'_>

Splits a string slice by whitespace.

The iterator returned will return string slices that are sub-slices of the original string slice, separated by any amount of whitespace.

‘Whitespace’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property White_Space. If you only want to split on ASCII whitespace instead, use split_ascii_whitespace.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let mut iter = "A few words".split_whitespace();

assert_eq!(Some("A"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("few"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("words"), iter.next());

assert_eq!(None, iter.next());

All kinds of whitespace are considered:

let mut iter = " Mary   had\ta\u{2009}little  \n\t lamb".split_whitespace();
assert_eq!(Some("Mary"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("had"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("a"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("little"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("lamb"), iter.next());

assert_eq!(None, iter.next());

If the string is empty or all whitespace, the iterator yields no string slices:

assert_eq!("".split_whitespace().next(), None);
assert_eq!("   ".split_whitespace().next(), None);
1.34.0 · source

pub fn split_ascii_whitespace(&self) -> SplitAsciiWhitespace<'_>

Splits a string slice by ASCII whitespace.

The iterator returned will return string slices that are sub-slices of the original string slice, separated by any amount of ASCII whitespace.

To split by Unicode Whitespace instead, use split_whitespace.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let mut iter = "A few words".split_ascii_whitespace();

assert_eq!(Some("A"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("few"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("words"), iter.next());

assert_eq!(None, iter.next());

All kinds of ASCII whitespace are considered:

let mut iter = " Mary   had\ta little  \n\t lamb".split_ascii_whitespace();
assert_eq!(Some("Mary"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("had"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("a"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("little"), iter.next());
assert_eq!(Some("lamb"), iter.next());

assert_eq!(None, iter.next());

If the string is empty or all ASCII whitespace, the iterator yields no string slices:

assert_eq!("".split_ascii_whitespace().next(), None);
assert_eq!("   ".split_ascii_whitespace().next(), None);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn lines(&self) -> Lines<'_>

An iterator over the lines of a string, as string slices.

Lines are split at line endings that are either newlines (\n) or sequences of a carriage return followed by a line feed (\r\n).

Line terminators are not included in the lines returned by the iterator.

Note that any carriage return (\r) not immediately followed by a line feed (\n) does not split a line. These carriage returns are thereby included in the produced lines.

The final line ending is optional. A string that ends with a final line ending will return the same lines as an otherwise identical string without a final line ending.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let text = "foo\r\nbar\n\nbaz\r";
let mut lines = text.lines();

assert_eq!(Some("foo"), lines.next());
assert_eq!(Some("bar"), lines.next());
assert_eq!(Some(""), lines.next());
// Trailing carriage return is included in the last line
assert_eq!(Some("baz\r"), lines.next());

assert_eq!(None, lines.next());

The final line does not require any ending:

let text = "foo\nbar\n\r\nbaz";
let mut lines = text.lines();

assert_eq!(Some("foo"), lines.next());
assert_eq!(Some("bar"), lines.next());
assert_eq!(Some(""), lines.next());
assert_eq!(Some("baz"), lines.next());

assert_eq!(None, lines.next());
1.0.0 · source

pub fn lines_any(&self) -> LinesAny<'_>

👎Deprecated since 1.4.0: use lines() instead now

An iterator over the lines of a string.

1.8.0 · source

pub fn encode_utf16(&self) -> EncodeUtf16<'_>

Returns an iterator of u16 over the string encoded as UTF-16.

§Examples
let text = "Zażółć gęślą jaźń";

let utf8_len = text.len();
let utf16_len = text.encode_utf16().count();

assert!(utf16_len <= utf8_len);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn contains<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> bool
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Returns true if the given pattern matches a sub-slice of this string slice.

Returns false if it does not.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples
let bananas = "bananas";

assert!(bananas.contains("nana"));
assert!(!bananas.contains("apples"));
1.0.0 · source

pub fn starts_with<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> bool
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Returns true if the given pattern matches a prefix of this string slice.

Returns false if it does not.

The pattern can be a &str, in which case this function will return true if the &str is a prefix of this string slice.

The pattern can also be a char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches. These will only be checked against the first character of this string slice. Look at the second example below regarding behavior for slices of chars.

§Examples
let bananas = "bananas";

assert!(bananas.starts_with("bana"));
assert!(!bananas.starts_with("nana"));
let bananas = "bananas";

// Note that both of these assert successfully.
assert!(bananas.starts_with(&['b', 'a', 'n', 'a']));
assert!(bananas.starts_with(&['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']));
1.0.0 · source

pub fn ends_with<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> bool
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

Returns true if the given pattern matches a suffix of this string slice.

Returns false if it does not.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples
let bananas = "bananas";

assert!(bananas.ends_with("anas"));
assert!(!bananas.ends_with("nana"));
1.0.0 · source

pub fn find<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> Option<usize>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Returns the byte index of the first character of this string slice that matches the pattern.

Returns None if the pattern doesn’t match.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard Gepardi";

assert_eq!(s.find('L'), Some(0));
assert_eq!(s.find('é'), Some(14));
assert_eq!(s.find("pard"), Some(17));

More complex patterns using point-free style and closures:

let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";

assert_eq!(s.find(char::is_whitespace), Some(5));
assert_eq!(s.find(char::is_lowercase), Some(1));
assert_eq!(s.find(|c: char| c.is_whitespace() || c.is_lowercase()), Some(1));
assert_eq!(s.find(|c: char| (c < 'o') && (c > 'a')), Some(4));

Not finding the pattern:

let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];

assert_eq!(s.find(x), None);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn rfind<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> Option<usize>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

Returns the byte index for the first character of the last match of the pattern in this string slice.

Returns None if the pattern doesn’t match.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard Gepardi";

assert_eq!(s.rfind('L'), Some(13));
assert_eq!(s.rfind('é'), Some(14));
assert_eq!(s.rfind("pard"), Some(24));

More complex patterns with closures:

let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";

assert_eq!(s.rfind(char::is_whitespace), Some(12));
assert_eq!(s.rfind(char::is_lowercase), Some(20));

Not finding the pattern:

let s = "Löwe 老虎 Léopard";
let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];

assert_eq!(s.rfind(x), None);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn split<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> Split<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

An iterator over substrings of this string slice, separated by characters matched by a pattern.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator will be a DoubleEndedIterator if the pattern allows a reverse search and forward/reverse search yields the same elements. This is true for, e.g., char, but not for &str.

If the pattern allows a reverse search but its results might differ from a forward search, the rsplit method can be used.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

let v: Vec<&str> = "Mary had a little lamb".split(' ').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["Mary", "had", "a", "little", "lamb"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "".split('X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, [""]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lionXXtigerXleopard".split('X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["lion", "", "tiger", "leopard"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lion::tiger::leopard".split("::").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["lion", "tiger", "leopard"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "abc1def2ghi".split(char::is_numeric).collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["abc", "def", "ghi"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lionXtigerXleopard".split(char::is_uppercase).collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["lion", "tiger", "leopard"]);

If the pattern is a slice of chars, split on each occurrence of any of the characters:

let v: Vec<&str> = "2020-11-03 23:59".split(&['-', ' ', ':', '@'][..]).collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["2020", "11", "03", "23", "59"]);

A more complex pattern, using a closure:

let v: Vec<&str> = "abc1defXghi".split(|c| c == '1' || c == 'X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["abc", "def", "ghi"]);

If a string contains multiple contiguous separators, you will end up with empty strings in the output:

let x = "||||a||b|c".to_string();
let d: Vec<_> = x.split('|').collect();

assert_eq!(d, &["", "", "", "", "a", "", "b", "c"]);

Contiguous separators are separated by the empty string.

let x = "(///)".to_string();
let d: Vec<_> = x.split('/').collect();

assert_eq!(d, &["(", "", "", ")"]);

Separators at the start or end of a string are neighbored by empty strings.

let d: Vec<_> = "010".split("0").collect();
assert_eq!(d, &["", "1", ""]);

When the empty string is used as a separator, it separates every character in the string, along with the beginning and end of the string.

let f: Vec<_> = "rust".split("").collect();
assert_eq!(f, &["", "r", "u", "s", "t", ""]);

Contiguous separators can lead to possibly surprising behavior when whitespace is used as the separator. This code is correct:

let x = "    a  b c".to_string();
let d: Vec<_> = x.split(' ').collect();

assert_eq!(d, &["", "", "", "", "a", "", "b", "c"]);

It does not give you:

assert_eq!(d, &["a", "b", "c"]);

Use split_whitespace for this behavior.

1.51.0 · source

pub fn split_inclusive<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> SplitInclusive<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

An iterator over substrings of this string slice, separated by characters matched by a pattern. Differs from the iterator produced by split in that split_inclusive leaves the matched part as the terminator of the substring.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples
let v: Vec<&str> = "Mary had a little lamb\nlittle lamb\nlittle lamb."
    .split_inclusive('\n').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["Mary had a little lamb\n", "little lamb\n", "little lamb."]);

If the last element of the string is matched, that element will be considered the terminator of the preceding substring. That substring will be the last item returned by the iterator.

let v: Vec<&str> = "Mary had a little lamb\nlittle lamb\nlittle lamb.\n"
    .split_inclusive('\n').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["Mary had a little lamb\n", "little lamb\n", "little lamb.\n"]);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn rsplit<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> RSplit<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

An iterator over substrings of the given string slice, separated by characters matched by a pattern and yielded in reverse order.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator requires that the pattern supports a reverse search, and it will be a DoubleEndedIterator if a forward/reverse search yields the same elements.

For iterating from the front, the split method can be used.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

let v: Vec<&str> = "Mary had a little lamb".rsplit(' ').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["lamb", "little", "a", "had", "Mary"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "".rsplit('X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, [""]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lionXXtigerXleopard".rsplit('X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["leopard", "tiger", "", "lion"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lion::tiger::leopard".rsplit("::").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["leopard", "tiger", "lion"]);

A more complex pattern, using a closure:

let v: Vec<&str> = "abc1defXghi".rsplit(|c| c == '1' || c == 'X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["ghi", "def", "abc"]);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn split_terminator<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> SplitTerminator<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

An iterator over substrings of the given string slice, separated by characters matched by a pattern.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

Equivalent to split, except that the trailing substring is skipped if empty.

This method can be used for string data that is terminated, rather than separated by a pattern.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator will be a DoubleEndedIterator if the pattern allows a reverse search and forward/reverse search yields the same elements. This is true for, e.g., char, but not for &str.

If the pattern allows a reverse search but its results might differ from a forward search, the rsplit_terminator method can be used.

§Examples
let v: Vec<&str> = "A.B.".split_terminator('.').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["A", "B"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "A..B..".split_terminator(".").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["A", "", "B", ""]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "A.B:C.D".split_terminator(&['.', ':'][..]).collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["A", "B", "C", "D"]);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn rsplit_terminator<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> RSplitTerminator<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

An iterator over substrings of self, separated by characters matched by a pattern and yielded in reverse order.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

Equivalent to split, except that the trailing substring is skipped if empty.

This method can be used for string data that is terminated, rather than separated by a pattern.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator requires that the pattern supports a reverse search, and it will be double ended if a forward/reverse search yields the same elements.

For iterating from the front, the split_terminator method can be used.

§Examples
let v: Vec<&str> = "A.B.".rsplit_terminator('.').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["B", "A"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "A..B..".rsplit_terminator(".").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["", "B", "", "A"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "A.B:C.D".rsplit_terminator(&['.', ':'][..]).collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["D", "C", "B", "A"]);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn splitn<'a, P>(&'a self, n: usize, pat: P) -> SplitN<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

An iterator over substrings of the given string slice, separated by a pattern, restricted to returning at most n items.

If n substrings are returned, the last substring (the nth substring) will contain the remainder of the string.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator will not be double ended, because it is not efficient to support.

If the pattern allows a reverse search, the rsplitn method can be used.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

let v: Vec<&str> = "Mary had a little lambda".splitn(3, ' ').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["Mary", "had", "a little lambda"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lionXXtigerXleopard".splitn(3, "X").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["lion", "", "tigerXleopard"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "abcXdef".splitn(1, 'X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["abcXdef"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "".splitn(1, 'X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, [""]);

A more complex pattern, using a closure:

let v: Vec<&str> = "abc1defXghi".splitn(2, |c| c == '1' || c == 'X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["abc", "defXghi"]);
1.0.0 · source

pub fn rsplitn<'a, P>(&'a self, n: usize, pat: P) -> RSplitN<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

An iterator over substrings of this string slice, separated by a pattern, starting from the end of the string, restricted to returning at most n items.

If n substrings are returned, the last substring (the nth substring) will contain the remainder of the string.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator will not be double ended, because it is not efficient to support.

For splitting from the front, the splitn method can be used.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

let v: Vec<&str> = "Mary had a little lamb".rsplitn(3, ' ').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["lamb", "little", "Mary had a"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lionXXtigerXleopard".rsplitn(3, 'X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["leopard", "tiger", "lionX"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "lion::tiger::leopard".rsplitn(2, "::").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["leopard", "lion::tiger"]);

A more complex pattern, using a closure:

let v: Vec<&str> = "abc1defXghi".rsplitn(2, |c| c == '1' || c == 'X').collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["ghi", "abc1def"]);
1.52.0 · source

pub fn split_once<'a, P>(&'a self, delimiter: P) -> Option<(&'a str, &'a str)>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Splits the string on the first occurrence of the specified delimiter and returns prefix before delimiter and suffix after delimiter.

§Examples
assert_eq!("cfg".split_once('='), None);
assert_eq!("cfg=".split_once('='), Some(("cfg", "")));
assert_eq!("cfg=foo".split_once('='), Some(("cfg", "foo")));
assert_eq!("cfg=foo=bar".split_once('='), Some(("cfg", "foo=bar")));
1.52.0 · source

pub fn rsplit_once<'a, P>(&'a self, delimiter: P) -> Option<(&'a str, &'a str)>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

Splits the string on the last occurrence of the specified delimiter and returns prefix before delimiter and suffix after delimiter.

§Examples
assert_eq!("cfg".rsplit_once('='), None);
assert_eq!("cfg=foo".rsplit_once('='), Some(("cfg", "foo")));
assert_eq!("cfg=foo=bar".rsplit_once('='), Some(("cfg=foo", "bar")));
1.2.0 · source

pub fn matches<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> Matches<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

An iterator over the disjoint matches of a pattern within the given string slice.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator will be a DoubleEndedIterator if the pattern allows a reverse search and forward/reverse search yields the same elements. This is true for, e.g., char, but not for &str.

If the pattern allows a reverse search but its results might differ from a forward search, the rmatches method can be used.

§Examples
let v: Vec<&str> = "abcXXXabcYYYabc".matches("abc").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["abc", "abc", "abc"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "1abc2abc3".matches(char::is_numeric).collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["1", "2", "3"]);
1.2.0 · source

pub fn rmatches<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> RMatches<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

An iterator over the disjoint matches of a pattern within this string slice, yielded in reverse order.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator requires that the pattern supports a reverse search, and it will be a DoubleEndedIterator if a forward/reverse search yields the same elements.

For iterating from the front, the matches method can be used.

§Examples
let v: Vec<&str> = "abcXXXabcYYYabc".rmatches("abc").collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["abc", "abc", "abc"]);

let v: Vec<&str> = "1abc2abc3".rmatches(char::is_numeric).collect();
assert_eq!(v, ["3", "2", "1"]);
1.5.0 · source

pub fn match_indices<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> MatchIndices<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

An iterator over the disjoint matches of a pattern within this string slice as well as the index that the match starts at.

For matches of pat within self that overlap, only the indices corresponding to the first match are returned.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator will be a DoubleEndedIterator if the pattern allows a reverse search and forward/reverse search yields the same elements. This is true for, e.g., char, but not for &str.

If the pattern allows a reverse search but its results might differ from a forward search, the rmatch_indices method can be used.

§Examples
let v: Vec<_> = "abcXXXabcYYYabc".match_indices("abc").collect();
assert_eq!(v, [(0, "abc"), (6, "abc"), (12, "abc")]);

let v: Vec<_> = "1abcabc2".match_indices("abc").collect();
assert_eq!(v, [(1, "abc"), (4, "abc")]);

let v: Vec<_> = "ababa".match_indices("aba").collect();
assert_eq!(v, [(0, "aba")]); // only the first `aba`
1.5.0 · source

pub fn rmatch_indices<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> RMatchIndices<'a, P>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

An iterator over the disjoint matches of a pattern within self, yielded in reverse order along with the index of the match.

For matches of pat within self that overlap, only the indices corresponding to the last match are returned.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Iterator behavior

The returned iterator requires that the pattern supports a reverse search, and it will be a DoubleEndedIterator if a forward/reverse search yields the same elements.

For iterating from the front, the match_indices method can be used.

§Examples
let v: Vec<_> = "abcXXXabcYYYabc".rmatch_indices("abc").collect();
assert_eq!(v, [(12, "abc"), (6, "abc"), (0, "abc")]);

let v: Vec<_> = "1abcabc2".rmatch_indices("abc").collect();
assert_eq!(v, [(4, "abc"), (1, "abc")]);

let v: Vec<_> = "ababa".rmatch_indices("aba").collect();
assert_eq!(v, [(2, "aba")]); // only the last `aba`
1.0.0 · source

pub fn trim(&self) -> &str

Returns a string slice with leading and trailing whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property White_Space, which includes newlines.

§Examples
let s = "\n Hello\tworld\t\n";

assert_eq!("Hello\tworld", s.trim());
1.30.0 · source

pub fn trim_start(&self) -> &str

Returns a string slice with leading whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property White_Space, which includes newlines.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. start in this context means the first position of that byte string; for a left-to-right language like English or Russian, this will be left side, and for right-to-left languages like Arabic or Hebrew, this will be the right side.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = "\n Hello\tworld\t\n";
assert_eq!("Hello\tworld\t\n", s.trim_start());

Directionality:

let s = "  English  ";
assert!(Some('E') == s.trim_start().chars().next());

let s = "  עברית  ";
assert!(Some('ע') == s.trim_start().chars().next());
1.30.0 · source

pub fn trim_end(&self) -> &str

Returns a string slice with trailing whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property White_Space, which includes newlines.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. end in this context means the last position of that byte string; for a left-to-right language like English or Russian, this will be right side, and for right-to-left languages like Arabic or Hebrew, this will be the left side.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = "\n Hello\tworld\t\n";
assert_eq!("\n Hello\tworld", s.trim_end());

Directionality:

let s = "  English  ";
assert!(Some('h') == s.trim_end().chars().rev().next());

let s = "  עברית  ";
assert!(Some('ת') == s.trim_end().chars().rev().next());
1.0.0 · source

pub fn trim_left(&self) -> &str

👎Deprecated since 1.33.0: superseded by trim_start

Returns a string slice with leading whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property White_Space.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. ‘Left’ in this context means the first position of that byte string; for a language like Arabic or Hebrew which are ‘right to left’ rather than ‘left to right’, this will be the right side, not the left.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = " Hello\tworld\t";

assert_eq!("Hello\tworld\t", s.trim_left());

Directionality:

let s = "  English";
assert!(Some('E') == s.trim_left().chars().next());

let s = "  עברית";
assert!(Some('ע') == s.trim_left().chars().next());
1.0.0 · source

pub fn trim_right(&self) -> &str

👎Deprecated since 1.33.0: superseded by trim_end

Returns a string slice with trailing whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property White_Space.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. ‘Right’ in this context means the last position of that byte string; for a language like Arabic or Hebrew which are ‘right to left’ rather than ‘left to right’, this will be the left side, not the right.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = " Hello\tworld\t";

assert_eq!(" Hello\tworld", s.trim_right());

Directionality:

let s = "English  ";
assert!(Some('h') == s.trim_right().chars().rev().next());

let s = "עברית  ";
assert!(Some('ת') == s.trim_right().chars().rev().next());
1.0.0 · source

pub fn trim_matches<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> &'a str
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: DoubleEndedSearcher<'a>,

Returns a string slice with all prefixes and suffixes that match a pattern repeatedly removed.

The pattern can be a char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

assert_eq!("11foo1bar11".trim_matches('1'), "foo1bar");
assert_eq!("123foo1bar123".trim_matches(char::is_numeric), "foo1bar");

let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];
assert_eq!("12foo1bar12".trim_matches(x), "foo1bar");

A more complex pattern, using a closure:

assert_eq!("1foo1barXX".trim_matches(|c| c == '1' || c == 'X'), "foo1bar");
1.30.0 · source

pub fn trim_start_matches<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> &'a str
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Returns a string slice with all prefixes that match a pattern repeatedly removed.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. start in this context means the first position of that byte string; for a left-to-right language like English or Russian, this will be left side, and for right-to-left languages like Arabic or Hebrew, this will be the right side.

§Examples
assert_eq!("11foo1bar11".trim_start_matches('1'), "foo1bar11");
assert_eq!("123foo1bar123".trim_start_matches(char::is_numeric), "foo1bar123");

let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];
assert_eq!("12foo1bar12".trim_start_matches(x), "foo1bar12");
1.45.0 · source

pub fn strip_prefix<'a, P>(&'a self, prefix: P) -> Option<&'a str>
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Returns a string slice with the prefix removed.

If the string starts with the pattern prefix, returns the substring after the prefix, wrapped in Some. Unlike trim_start_matches, this method removes the prefix exactly once.

If the string does not start with prefix, returns None.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples
assert_eq!("foo:bar".strip_prefix("foo:"), Some("bar"));
assert_eq!("foo:bar".strip_prefix("bar"), None);
assert_eq!("foofoo".strip_prefix("foo"), Some("foo"));
1.45.0 · source

pub fn strip_suffix<'a, P>(&'a self, suffix: P) -> Option<&'a str>
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

Returns a string slice with the suffix removed.

If the string ends with the pattern suffix, returns the substring before the suffix, wrapped in Some. Unlike trim_end_matches, this method removes the suffix exactly once.

If the string does not end with suffix, returns None.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Examples
assert_eq!("bar:foo".strip_suffix(":foo"), Some("bar"));
assert_eq!("bar:foo".strip_suffix("bar"), None);
assert_eq!("foofoo".strip_suffix("foo"), Some("foo"));
1.30.0 · source

pub fn trim_end_matches<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> &'a str
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

Returns a string slice with all suffixes that match a pattern repeatedly removed.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. end in this context means the last position of that byte string; for a left-to-right language like English or Russian, this will be right side, and for right-to-left languages like Arabic or Hebrew, this will be the left side.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

assert_eq!("11foo1bar11".trim_end_matches('1'), "11foo1bar");
assert_eq!("123foo1bar123".trim_end_matches(char::is_numeric), "123foo1bar");

let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];
assert_eq!("12foo1bar12".trim_end_matches(x), "12foo1bar");

A more complex pattern, using a closure:

assert_eq!("1fooX".trim_end_matches(|c| c == '1' || c == 'X'), "1foo");
1.0.0 · source

pub fn trim_left_matches<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> &'a str
where P: Pattern<'a>,

👎Deprecated since 1.33.0: superseded by trim_start_matches

Returns a string slice with all prefixes that match a pattern repeatedly removed.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. ‘Left’ in this context means the first position of that byte string; for a language like Arabic or Hebrew which are ‘right to left’ rather than ‘left to right’, this will be the right side, not the left.

§Examples
assert_eq!("11foo1bar11".trim_left_matches('1'), "foo1bar11");
assert_eq!("123foo1bar123".trim_left_matches(char::is_numeric), "foo1bar123");

let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];
assert_eq!("12foo1bar12".trim_left_matches(x), "foo1bar12");
1.0.0 · source

pub fn trim_right_matches<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P) -> &'a str
where P: Pattern<'a>, <P as Pattern<'a>>::Searcher: ReverseSearcher<'a>,

👎Deprecated since 1.33.0: superseded by trim_end_matches

Returns a string slice with all suffixes that match a pattern repeatedly removed.

The pattern can be a &str, char, a slice of chars, or a function or closure that determines if a character matches.

§Text directionality

A string is a sequence of bytes. ‘Right’ in this context means the last position of that byte string; for a language like Arabic or Hebrew which are ‘right to left’ rather than ‘left to right’, this will be the left side, not the right.

§Examples

Simple patterns:

assert_eq!("11foo1bar11".trim_right_matches('1'), "11foo1bar");
assert_eq!("123foo1bar123".trim_right_matches(char::is_numeric), "123foo1bar");

let x: &[_] = &['1', '2'];
assert_eq!("12foo1bar12".trim_right_matches(x), "12foo1bar");

A more complex pattern, using a closure:

assert_eq!("1fooX".trim_right_matches(|c| c == '1' || c == 'X'), "1foo");
1.0.0 · source

pub fn parse<F>(&self) -> Result<F, <F as FromStr>::Err>
where F: FromStr,

Parses this string slice into another type.

Because parse is so general, it can cause problems with type inference. As such, parse is one of the few times you’ll see the syntax affectionately known as the ‘turbofish’: ::<>. This helps the inference algorithm understand specifically which type you’re trying to parse into.

parse can parse into any type that implements the FromStr trait.

§Errors

Will return Err if it’s not possible to parse this string slice into the desired type.

§Examples

Basic usage

let four: u32 = "4".parse().unwrap();

assert_eq!(4, four);

Using the ‘turbofish’ instead of annotating four:

let four = "4".parse::<u32>();

assert_eq!(Ok(4), four);

Failing to parse:

let nope = "j".parse::<u32>();

assert!(nope.is_err());
1.23.0 · source

pub fn is_ascii(&self) -> bool

Checks if all characters in this string are within the ASCII range.

§Examples
let ascii = "hello!\n";
let non_ascii = "Grüße, Jürgen ❤";

assert!(ascii.is_ascii());
assert!(!non_ascii.is_ascii());
source

pub fn as_ascii(&self) -> Option<&[AsciiChar]>

🔬This is a nightly-only experimental API. (ascii_char)

If this string slice is_ascii, returns it as a slice of ASCII characters, otherwise returns None.

1.23.0 · source

pub fn eq_ignore_ascii_case(&self, other: &str) -> bool

Checks that two strings are an ASCII case-insensitive match.

Same as to_ascii_lowercase(a) == to_ascii_lowercase(b), but without allocating and copying temporaries.

§Examples
assert!("Ferris".eq_ignore_ascii_case("FERRIS"));
assert!("Ferrös".eq_ignore_ascii_case("FERRöS"));
assert!(!"Ferrös".eq_ignore_ascii_case("FERRÖS"));
1.80.0 · source

pub fn trim_ascii_start(&self) -> &str

Returns a string slice with leading ASCII whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ refers to the definition used by u8::is_ascii_whitespace.

§Examples
assert_eq!(" \t \u{3000}hello world\n".trim_ascii_start(), "\u{3000}hello world\n");
assert_eq!("  ".trim_ascii_start(), "");
assert_eq!("".trim_ascii_start(), "");
1.80.0 · source

pub fn trim_ascii_end(&self) -> &str

Returns a string slice with trailing ASCII whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ refers to the definition used by u8::is_ascii_whitespace.

§Examples
assert_eq!("\r hello world\u{3000}\n ".trim_ascii_end(), "\r hello world\u{3000}");
assert_eq!("  ".trim_ascii_end(), "");
assert_eq!("".trim_ascii_end(), "");
1.80.0 · source

pub fn trim_ascii(&self) -> &str

Returns a string slice with leading and trailing ASCII whitespace removed.

‘Whitespace’ refers to the definition used by u8::is_ascii_whitespace.

§Examples
assert_eq!("\r hello world\n ".trim_ascii(), "hello world");
assert_eq!("  ".trim_ascii(), "");
assert_eq!("".trim_ascii(), "");
1.34.0 · source

pub fn escape_debug(&self) -> EscapeDebug<'_>

Return an iterator that escapes each char in self with char::escape_debug.

Note: only extended grapheme codepoints that begin the string will be escaped.

§Examples

As an iterator:

for c in "❤\n!".escape_debug() {
    print!("{c}");
}
println!();

Using println! directly:

println!("{}", "❤\n!".escape_debug());

Both are equivalent to:

println!("❤\\n!");

Using to_string:

assert_eq!("❤\n!".escape_debug().to_string(), "❤\\n!");
1.34.0 · source

pub fn escape_default(&self) -> EscapeDefault<'_>

Return an iterator that escapes each char in self with char::escape_default.

§Examples

As an iterator:

for c in "❤\n!".escape_default() {
    print!("{c}");
}
println!();

Using println! directly:

println!("{}", "❤\n!".escape_default());

Both are equivalent to:

println!("\\u{{2764}}\\n!");

Using to_string:

assert_eq!("❤\n!".escape_default().to_string(), "\\u{2764}\\n!");
1.34.0 · source

pub fn escape_unicode(&self) -> EscapeUnicode<'_>

Return an iterator that escapes each char in self with char::escape_unicode.

§Examples

As an iterator:

for c in "❤\n!".escape_unicode() {
    print!("{c}");
}
println!();

Using println! directly:

println!("{}", "❤\n!".escape_unicode());

Both are equivalent to:

println!("\\u{{2764}}\\u{{a}}\\u{{21}}");

Using to_string:

assert_eq!("❤\n!".escape_unicode().to_string(), "\\u{2764}\\u{a}\\u{21}");
1.0.0 · source

pub fn replace<'a, P>(&'a self, from: P, to: &str) -> String
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Replaces all matches of a pattern with another string.

replace creates a new String, and copies the data from this string slice into it. While doing so, it attempts to find matches of a pattern. If it finds any, it replaces them with the replacement string slice.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = "this is old";

assert_eq!("this is new", s.replace("old", "new"));
assert_eq!("than an old", s.replace("is", "an"));

When the pattern doesn’t match, it returns this string slice as String:

let s = "this is old";
assert_eq!(s, s.replace("cookie monster", "little lamb"));
1.16.0 · source

pub fn replacen<'a, P>(&'a self, pat: P, to: &str, count: usize) -> String
where P: Pattern<'a>,

Replaces first N matches of a pattern with another string.

replacen creates a new String, and copies the data from this string slice into it. While doing so, it attempts to find matches of a pattern. If it finds any, it replaces them with the replacement string slice at most count times.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = "foo foo 123 foo";
assert_eq!("new new 123 foo", s.replacen("foo", "new", 2));
assert_eq!("faa fao 123 foo", s.replacen('o', "a", 3));
assert_eq!("foo foo new23 foo", s.replacen(char::is_numeric, "new", 1));

When the pattern doesn’t match, it returns this string slice as String:

let s = "this is old";
assert_eq!(s, s.replacen("cookie monster", "little lamb", 10));
1.2.0 · source

pub fn to_lowercase(&self) -> String

Returns the lowercase equivalent of this string slice, as a new String.

‘Lowercase’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property Lowercase.

Since some characters can expand into multiple characters when changing the case, this function returns a String instead of modifying the parameter in-place.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = "HELLO";

assert_eq!("hello", s.to_lowercase());

A tricky example, with sigma:

let sigma = "Σ";

assert_eq!("σ", sigma.to_lowercase());

// but at the end of a word, it's ς, not σ:
let odysseus = "ὈΔΥΣΣΕΎΣ";

assert_eq!("ὀδυσσεύς", odysseus.to_lowercase());

Languages without case are not changed:

let new_year = "农历新年";

assert_eq!(new_year, new_year.to_lowercase());
1.2.0 · source

pub fn to_uppercase(&self) -> String

Returns the uppercase equivalent of this string slice, as a new String.

‘Uppercase’ is defined according to the terms of the Unicode Derived Core Property Uppercase.

Since some characters can expand into multiple characters when changing the case, this function returns a String instead of modifying the parameter in-place.

§Examples

Basic usage:

let s = "hello";

assert_eq!("HELLO", s.to_uppercase());

Scripts without case are not changed:

let new_year = "农历新年";

assert_eq!(new_year, new_year.to_uppercase());

One character can become multiple:

let s = "tschüß";

assert_eq!("TSCHÜSS", s.to_uppercase());
1.16.0 · source

pub fn repeat(&self, n: usize) -> String

Creates a new String by repeating a string n times.

§Panics

This function will panic if the capacity would overflow.

§Examples

Basic usage:

assert_eq!("abc".repeat(4), String::from("abcabcabcabc"));

A panic upon overflow:

// this will panic at runtime
let huge = "0123456789abcdef".repeat(usize::MAX);
1.23.0 · source

pub fn to_ascii_uppercase(&self) -> String

Returns a copy of this string where each character is mapped to its ASCII upper case equivalent.

ASCII letters ‘a’ to ‘z’ are mapped to ‘A’ to ‘Z’, but non-ASCII letters are unchanged.

To uppercase the value in-place, use make_ascii_uppercase.

To uppercase ASCII characters in addition to non-ASCII characters, use to_uppercase.

§Examples
let s = "Grüße, Jürgen ❤";

assert_eq!("GRüßE, JüRGEN ❤", s.to_ascii_uppercase());
1.23.0 · source

pub fn to_ascii_lowercase(&self) -> String

Returns a copy of this string where each character is mapped to its ASCII lower case equivalent.

ASCII letters ‘A’ to ‘Z’ are mapped to ‘a’ to ‘z’, but non-ASCII letters are unchanged.

To lowercase the value in-place, use make_ascii_lowercase.

To lowercase ASCII characters in addition to non-ASCII characters, use to_lowercase.

§Examples
let s = "Grüße, Jürgen ❤";

assert_eq!("grüße, jürgen ❤", s.to_ascii_lowercase());

Trait Implementations§

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impl AsRef<[u8]> for GString

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fn as_ref(&self) -> &[u8]

Converts this type into a shared reference of the (usually inferred) input type.
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impl AsRef<GStr> for GString

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fn as_ref(&self) -> &GStr

Converts this type into a shared reference of the (usually inferred) input type.
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impl AsRef<OsStr> for GString

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fn as_ref(&self) -> &OsStr

Converts this type into a shared reference of the (usually inferred) input type.
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impl AsRef<Path> for GString

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fn as_ref(&self) -> &Path

Converts this type into a shared reference of the (usually inferred) input type.
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impl AsRef<str> for GString

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fn as_ref(&self) -> &str

Converts this type into a shared reference of the (usually inferred) input type.
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impl Borrow<GStr> for GString

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fn borrow(&self) -> &GStr

Immutably borrows from an owned value. Read more
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impl Borrow<str> for GString

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fn borrow(&self) -> &str

Immutably borrows from an owned value. Read more
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impl Clone for GString

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fn clone(&self) -> GString

Returns a copy of the value. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn clone_from(&mut self, source: &Self)

Performs copy-assignment from source. Read more
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impl Debug for GString

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fn fmt(&self, f: &mut Formatter<'_>) -> Result

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more
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impl Default for GString

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fn default() -> Self

Returns the “default value” for a type. Read more
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impl Deref for GString

§

type Target = str

The resulting type after dereferencing.
source§

fn deref(&self) -> &str

Dereferences the value.
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impl Display for GString

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fn fmt(&self, f: &mut Formatter<'_>) -> Result

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more
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impl Drop for GString

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fn drop(&mut self)

Executes the destructor for this type. Read more
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impl Extend<GString> for StrV

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fn extend<I: IntoIterator<Item = GString>>(&mut self, iter: I)

Extends a collection with the contents of an iterator. Read more
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fn extend_one(&mut self, item: A)

🔬This is a nightly-only experimental API. (extend_one)
Extends a collection with exactly one element.
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fn extend_reserve(&mut self, additional: usize)

🔬This is a nightly-only experimental API. (extend_one)
Reserves capacity in a collection for the given number of additional elements. Read more
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impl From<&GStr> for GString

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fn from(s: &GStr) -> GString

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl<'a> From<&'a GString> for Cow<'a, GStr>

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fn from(s: &'a GString) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<&String> for GString

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fn from(s: &String) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<&str> for GString

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fn from(s: &str) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<Box<str>> for GString

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fn from(s: Box<str>) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl<'a> From<Cow<'a, GStr>> for GString

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fn from(s: Cow<'a, GStr>) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl<'a> From<Cow<'a, str>> for GString

source§

fn from(s: Cow<'a, str>) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<GString> for Box<str>

source§

fn from(s: GString) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl<'a> From<GString> for Cow<'a, GStr>

source§

fn from(v: GString) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<GString> for OsString

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fn from(s: GString) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<GString> for PathBuf

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fn from(s: GString) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<GString> for String

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fn from(s: GString) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<GString> for Value

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fn from(s: GString) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<GString> for Vec<u8>

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fn from(value: GString) -> Vec<u8>

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<GStringPtr> for GString

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fn from(s: GStringPtr) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl From<String> for GString

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fn from(s: String) -> Self

Converts to this type from the input type.
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impl FromGlibContainerAsVec<*const i8, *const *const i8> for GString

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impl FromGlibContainerAsVec<*const i8, *mut *const i8> for GString

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impl FromGlibContainerAsVec<*mut i8, *const *mut i8> for GString

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impl FromGlibContainerAsVec<*mut i8, *mut *mut i8> for GString

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impl FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<*const i8, *const *const i8> for GString

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impl FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<*const i8, *mut *const i8> for GString

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impl FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<*mut i8, *const *mut i8> for GString

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impl FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<*mut i8, *mut *mut i8> for GString

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impl FromIterator<GString> for StrV

source§

fn from_iter<I: IntoIterator<Item = GString>>(iter: I) -> Self

Creates a value from an iterator. Read more
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impl<'a> FromValue<'a> for GString

§

type Checker = GenericValueTypeOrNoneChecker<GString>

Value type checker.
source§

unsafe fn from_value(value: &'a Value) -> Self

Get the contained value from a Value. Read more
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impl GlibPtrDefault for GString

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impl HasParamSpec for GString

§

type ParamSpec = ParamSpecString

§

type SetValue = str

Preferred value to be used as setter for the associated ParamSpec.
§

type BuilderFn = fn(_: &str) -> ParamSpecStringBuilder<'_>

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fn param_spec_builder() -> Self::BuilderFn

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impl Hash for GString

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fn hash<H: Hasher>(&self, state: &mut H)

Feeds this value into the given Hasher. Read more
1.3.0 · source§

fn hash_slice<H>(data: &[Self], state: &mut H)
where H: Hasher, Self: Sized,

Feeds a slice of this type into the given Hasher. Read more
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impl IntoGStr for &GString

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fn run_with_gstr<T, F: FnOnce(&GStr) -> T>(self, f: F) -> T

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impl IntoGStr for GString

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fn run_with_gstr<T, F: FnOnce(&GStr) -> T>(self, f: F) -> T

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impl IntoGlibPtr<*mut i8> for GString

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unsafe fn into_glib_ptr(self) -> *mut c_char

Transform into a nul-terminated raw C string pointer.

source§

impl Ord for GString

source§

fn cmp(&self, other: &GString) -> Ordering

This method returns an Ordering between self and other. Read more
1.21.0 · source§

fn max(self, other: Self) -> Self
where Self: Sized,

Compares and returns the maximum of two values. Read more
1.21.0 · source§

fn min(self, other: Self) -> Self
where Self: Sized,

Compares and returns the minimum of two values. Read more
1.50.0 · source§

fn clamp(self, min: Self, max: Self) -> Self
where Self: Sized + PartialOrd,

Restrict a value to a certain interval. Read more
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impl PartialEq<&GStr> for GString

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fn eq(&self, other: &&GStr) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl PartialEq<&str> for GString

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fn eq(&self, other: &&str) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl PartialEq<GStr> for GString

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &GStr) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
source§

impl PartialEq<GString> for &GStr

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &GString) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl PartialEq<GString> for &str

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fn eq(&self, other: &GString) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl PartialEq<GString> for GStr

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &GString) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl PartialEq<GString> for GStringPtr

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fn eq(&self, other: &GString) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl PartialEq<GString> for String

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &GString) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
source§

impl PartialEq<GString> for str

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &GString) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl PartialEq<GStringPtr> for GString

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &GStringPtr) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
source§

impl PartialEq<String> for GString

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &String) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
source§

impl PartialEq<str> for GString

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &str) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
source§

impl PartialEq for GString

source§

fn eq(&self, other: &GString) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
source§

impl PartialOrd<GStr> for GString

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fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &GStr) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd<GString> for GStr

source§

fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &GString) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd<GString> for GStringPtr

source§

fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &GString) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd<GString> for String

source§

fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &GString) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd<GString> for str

source§

fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &GString) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd<GStringPtr> for GString

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fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &GStringPtr) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd<String> for GString

source§

fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &String) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd<str> for GString

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fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &str) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
source§

impl PartialOrd for GString

source§

fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &GString) -> Option<Ordering>

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator. Read more
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fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator. Read more
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fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator. Read more
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impl StaticType for GString

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fn static_type() -> Type

Returns the type identifier of Self.
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impl<'a> ToGlibContainerFromSlice<'a, *const *const i8> for GString

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impl<'a> ToGlibContainerFromSlice<'a, *const *mut i8> for GString

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impl<'a> ToGlibContainerFromSlice<'a, *mut *const i8> for GString

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impl<'a> ToGlibContainerFromSlice<'a, *mut *mut i8> for GString

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impl ToValue for GString

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fn to_value(&self) -> Value

Convert a value to a Value.
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fn value_type(&self) -> Type

Returns the type identifier of self. Read more
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impl ToValueOptional for GString

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fn to_value_optional(s: Option<&Self>) -> Value

Convert an Option to a Value.
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impl TryFrom<&CStr> for GString

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type Error = Utf8Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_from(value: &CStr) -> Result<Self, Self::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl TryFrom<CString> for GString

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type Error = GStringUtf8Error<CString>

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_from(value: CString) -> Result<Self, Self::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl TryFrom<GString> for CString

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type Error = GStringInteriorNulError<GString>

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_from(value: GString) -> Result<Self, Self::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl TryFrom<OsString> for GString

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type Error = GStringFromError<OsString>

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_from(value: OsString) -> Result<Self, Self::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl TryFrom<PathBuf> for GString

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type Error = GStringFromError<PathBuf>

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_from(value: PathBuf) -> Result<Self, Self::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl ValueType for GString

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type Type = String

Type to get the Type from. Read more
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impl Eq for GString

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impl Send for GString

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impl Sync for GString

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impl ValueTypeOptional for GString

Auto Trait Implementations§

Blanket Implementations§

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impl<T> Any for T
where T: 'static + ?Sized,

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fn type_id(&self) -> TypeId

Gets the TypeId of self. Read more
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impl<T> Borrow<T> for T
where T: ?Sized,

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fn borrow(&self) -> &T

Immutably borrows from an owned value. Read more
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impl<T> BorrowMut<T> for T
where T: ?Sized,

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fn borrow_mut(&mut self) -> &mut T

Mutably borrows from an owned value. Read more
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impl<T> From<T> for T

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fn from(t: T) -> T

Returns the argument unchanged.

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impl<T> FromGlibContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *const GList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_num_as_vec(ptr: *const GList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_num_as_vec(_: *const GList, _: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_num_as_vec(_: *const GList, _: usize) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *const GPtrArray> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_num_as_vec(ptr: *const GPtrArray, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_num_as_vec( _: *const GPtrArray, _: usize, ) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_num_as_vec(_: *const GPtrArray, _: usize) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *const GSList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_num_as_vec(ptr: *const GSList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_num_as_vec(_: *const GSList, _: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_num_as_vec(_: *const GSList, _: usize) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *mut GList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *mut GPtrArray> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GPtrArray, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_num_as_vec( ptr: *mut GPtrArray, num: usize, ) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GPtrArray, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *mut GSList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GSList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GSList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_num_as_vec(ptr: *mut GSList, num: usize) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *const GList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_as_vec(ptr: *const GList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_as_vec(_: *const GList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_as_vec(_: *const GList) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *const GPtrArray> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_as_vec(ptr: *const GPtrArray) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_as_vec(_: *const GPtrArray) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_as_vec(_: *const GPtrArray) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *const GSList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_as_vec(ptr: *const GSList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_as_vec(_: *const GSList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_as_vec(_: *const GSList) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *mut GList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_as_vec(ptr: *mut GList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_as_vec(ptr: *mut GList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_as_vec(ptr: *mut GList) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *mut GPtrArray> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_as_vec(ptr: *mut GPtrArray) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_as_vec(ptr: *mut GPtrArray) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_as_vec(ptr: *mut GPtrArray) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T> FromGlibPtrArrayContainerAsVec<<T as GlibPtrDefault>::GlibType, *mut GSList> for T

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unsafe fn from_glib_none_as_vec(ptr: *mut GSList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_container_as_vec(ptr: *mut GSList) -> Vec<T>

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unsafe fn from_glib_full_as_vec(ptr: *mut GSList) -> Vec<T>

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impl<T, U> Into<U> for T
where U: From<T>,

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fn into(self) -> U

Calls U::from(self).

That is, this conversion is whatever the implementation of From<T> for U chooses to do.

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impl<T> IntoClosureReturnValue for T
where T: Into<Value>,

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impl<T> Property for T
where T: HasParamSpec,

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type Value = T

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impl<T> PropertyGet for T
where T: HasParamSpec,

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type Value = T

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fn get<R, F>(&self, f: F) -> R
where F: Fn(&<T as PropertyGet>::Value) -> R,

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impl<T> StaticTypeExt for T
where T: StaticType,

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fn ensure_type()

Ensures that the type has been registered with the type system.
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impl<T> ToOwned for T
where T: Clone,

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type Owned = T

The resulting type after obtaining ownership.
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fn to_owned(&self) -> T

Creates owned data from borrowed data, usually by cloning. Read more
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fn clone_into(&self, target: &mut T)

Uses borrowed data to replace owned data, usually by cloning. Read more
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impl<T> ToSendValue for T
where T: Send + ToValue + ?Sized,

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fn to_send_value(&self) -> SendValue

Returns a SendValue clone of self.
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impl<T> ToString for T
where T: Display + ?Sized,

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default fn to_string(&self) -> String

Converts the given value to a String. Read more
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impl<T, U> TryFrom<U> for T
where U: Into<T>,

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type Error = Infallible

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_from(value: U) -> Result<T, <T as TryFrom<U>>::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl<T> TryFromClosureReturnValue for T
where T: for<'a> FromValue<'a> + StaticType + 'static,

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impl<T, U> TryInto<U> for T
where U: TryFrom<T>,

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type Error = <U as TryFrom<T>>::Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_into(self) -> Result<U, <U as TryFrom<T>>::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl<'a, T, C, E> FromValueOptional<'a> for T
where T: FromValue<'a, Checker = C>, C: ValueTypeChecker<Error = ValueTypeMismatchOrNoneError<E>>, E: Error + Send + 'static,