Struct gtk4::Dialog[][src]

pub struct Dialog(_);
Expand description

Dialogs are a convenient way to prompt the user for a small amount of input.

An example GtkDialog

Typical uses are to display a message, ask a question, or anything else that does not require extensive effort on the user’s part.

The main area of a Dialog is called the “content area”, and is yours to populate with widgets such a Label or Entry, to present your information, questions, or tasks to the user.

In addition, dialogs allow you to add “action widgets”. Most commonly, action widgets are buttons. Depending on the platform, action widgets may be presented in the header bar at the top of the window, or at the bottom of the window. To add action widgets, create your Dialog using with_buttons(), or use DialogExt::add_button(), DialogExtManual::add_buttons(), or DialogExt::add_action_widget().

GtkDialogs uses some heuristics to decide whether to add a close button to the window decorations. If any of the action buttons use the response ID ResponseType::Close or ResponseType::Cancel, the close button is omitted.

Clicking a button that was added as an action widget will emit the signal::Dialog::response signal with a response ID that you specified. GTK will never assign a meaning to positive response IDs; these are entirely user-defined. But for convenience, you can use the response IDs in the ResponseType enumeration (these all have values less than zero). If a dialog receives a delete event, the signal::Dialog::response signal will be emitted with the ResponseType::DeleteEvent response ID.

Dialogs are created with a call to new() or with_buttons(). The latter is recommended; it allows you to set the dialog title, some convenient flags, and add buttons.

A “modal” dialog (that is, one which freezes the rest of the application from user input), can be created by calling GtkWindowExt::set_modal() on the dialog. When using with_buttons(), you can also pass the DialogFlags::MODAL flag to make a dialog modal.

For the simple dialog in the following example, a MessageDialog would save some effort. But you’d need to create the dialog contents manually if you had more than a simple message in the dialog.

An example for simple Dialog usage: ⚠️ The following code is in c ⚠️

// Function to open a dialog box with a message
void
quick_message (GtkWindow *parent, char *message)
{
 GtkWidget *dialog, *label, *content_area;
 GtkDialogFlags flags;

 // Create the widgets
 flags = GTK_DIALOG_DESTROY_WITH_PARENT;
 dialog = gtk_dialog_new_with_buttons ("Message",
                                       parent,
                                       flags,
                                       _("_OK"),
                                       GTK_RESPONSE_NONE,
                                       NULL);
 content_area = gtk_dialog_get_content_area (GTK_DIALOG (dialog));
 label = gtk_label_new (message);

 // Ensure that the dialog box is destroyed when the user responds

 g_signal_connect_swapped (dialog,
                           "response",
                           G_CALLBACK (gtk_window_destroy),
                           dialog);

 // Add the label, and show everything we’ve added

 gtk_box_append (GTK_BOX (content_area), label);
 gtk_widget_show (dialog);
}

GtkDialog as GtkBuildable

The Dialog implementation of the Buildable interface exposes the content_area as an internal child with the name “content_area”.

Dialog supports a custom <action-widgets> element, which can contain multiple <action-widget> elements. The “response” attribute specifies a numeric response, and the content of the element is the id of widget (which should be a child of the dialogs action_area). To mark a response as default, set the “default“ attribute of the <action-widget> element to true.

Dialog supports adding action widgets by specifying “action“ as the “type“ attribute of a <child> element. The widget will be added either to the action area or the headerbar of the dialog, depending on the “use-header-bar“ property. The response id has to be associated with the action widget using the <action-widgets> element.

An example of a Dialog UI definition fragment:

<object class="GtkDialog" id="dialog1">
  <child type="action">
    <object class="GtkButton" id="button_cancel"/>
  </child>
  <child type="action">
    <object class="GtkButton" id="button_ok">
    </object>
  </child>
  <action-widgets>
    <action-widget response="cancel">button_cancel</action-widget>
    <action-widget response="ok" default="true">button_ok</action-widget>
  </action-widgets>
</object>

Accessibility

Dialog uses the AccessibleRole::Dialog role.

Implements

DialogExt, GtkWindowExt, WidgetExt, glib::ObjectExt, AccessibleExt, BuildableExt, ConstraintTargetExt, NativeExt, RootExt, ShortcutManagerExt, DialogExtManual, WidgetExtManual, AccessibleExtManual

Implementations

Creates a new dialog box.

Widgets should not be packed into the Window directly, but into the content_area and action_area, as described above.

Returns

the new dialog as a Widget

Creates a new builder-pattern struct instance to construct Dialog objects.

This method returns an instance of DialogBuilder which can be used to create Dialog objects.

Creates a new Dialog with the given title and transient parent.

The flags argument can be used to make the dialog modal, have it destroyed along with its transient parent, or make it use a headerbar.

Button text/response ID pairs should be listed in pairs, with a None pointer ending the list. Button text can be arbitrary text. A response ID can be any positive number, or one of the values in the ResponseType enumeration. If the user clicks one of these buttons, Dialog will emit the signal::Dialog::response signal with the corresponding response ID.

If a Dialog receives a delete event, it will emit ::response with a response ID of ResponseType::DeleteEvent.

However, destroying a dialog does not emit the ::response signal; so be careful relying on ::response when using the DialogFlags::DESTROY_WITH_PARENT flag.

Here’s a simple example: ⚠️ The following code is in c ⚠️

GtkWindow *main_app_window; // Window the dialog should show up on
GtkWidget *dialog;
GtkDialogFlags flags = GTK_DIALOG_MODAL | GTK_DIALOG_DESTROY_WITH_PARENT;
dialog = gtk_dialog_new_with_buttons ("My dialog",
                                      main_app_window,
                                      flags,
                                      _("_OK"),
                                      GTK_RESPONSE_ACCEPT,
                                      _("_Cancel"),
                                      GTK_RESPONSE_REJECT,
                                      NULL);

title

Title of the dialog, or None

parent

Transient parent of the dialog, or None

flags

from DialogFlags

first_button_text

text to go in first button, or None

Returns

a new Dialog

Trait Implementations

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Emit signal by signal id.

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